Air Force Museum of Alberta

Paul Hartman

"His record can be matched only by those airman of high endeavour and professional calling, who have devoted their lives and skills to the benefit of the free world, despite adversity, and whose contributions have substantially benefited Canadian aviation.“

Paul Hartman

"His record can be matched only by those airman of high endeavour and professional calling, who have devoted their lives and skills to the benefit of the free world, despite adversity, and whose contributions have substantially benefited Canadian aviation.“

Paul Hartman

Paul Albert Hartman moved to South Portland, Maine in 1933 where he was educated and learned to fly. He enlisted in 1941 in the RCAF and graduated as a pilot the same year. Hartman then completed operational training in Northern Ireland and joined No. 69 Squadron, RAF at Malta in 1942 where he flew a Wellington bomber on night operations. At the end of the war, Hartman served at the Test and Development Establishment at Rockcliffe, Ontario and later was named the commanding officer of the Central Experimenting and Proving Establishment.

His extensive flying experience in all RCAF aircraft placed him in the role of test pilot of the CF-100 and the F-86E acceptance trials. In 1959 he became famous for piloting a slightly less modern aircraft - a replica of the Silver Dart that RCAF personnel had built at Trenton to commemorate the 50th anniversary flight by J.A.D. McCurdy at Baddeck, Nova Scotia., in 1909.

Born: 25 Nov 1918, Grafton, Massachusetts
Died: 30 Jan 1990
Awards: DFC, AFC, CD

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